WW1 AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN FUZES GALLERY

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Fusée Russe
Austro-Hungarian fuzes characteristics

Percussion fuzes
Percussion fuze M75
Percussion fuze GZ M01
Base percussion fuze VZ M09

Time, or time and percussion fuzes
Time fuze M80
Time and percussion fuze DZ M93a
Time and percussion fuze DZ M96, M96a and M96c
Time and percussion fuze SDZ and GDZ M99 7cm
Time and percussion fuze SDZ and GDZ M99 10cm, M99a and M99b
Time and percussion fuze SDZ and GDZ M05
Time and percussion fuze SDZ and GDZ M08 and M08B

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Main characteristics or Austro-Hungarian fuzes

Turkish time and percussion fuze


At the war start in 1914, Austria-Hungary owns an artillery inventory composed of both old and modern weapons created by its powerful industry, as well as the associated shells and fuzes. Apart from very rare exceptions these fuzes were made in bronze or brass, steel and zinc alloys being very seldom introduced and only in the very last phases on the conflict.

These main categories were most often met with the corresponding names :
  • Time fuzes
  • Percussion fuzes - GranatenZünder ('G.Z. or Gr.Z.')
  • Time and percussion fuzes for schrapnell shell - SchrapnellDoppelZünder ('S.D.Z.') or DoppelZünder ('D.Z.')
  • Time and percussion fuzes for high explosive shell - GranatenDoppelZünder ('G.D.Z.')
As in most countries, the Austro-Hungarian fuzes nomenclature also included the design year preceeded bt the letter 'M' (Muster), and sometimes added with a variant indication (lowercase letter). The system chosen for the time fuzes was the rotating discs type.

Compared to the other fighting nations, surprisingly very few new fuzes type - if none - were developped during the war. At the end of the war, the old Empire was also using zome German fuzes.






Percussion fuzes


Percussion fuze GZ M75
Percussion fuze G.Z. Muster 1875

Like most of the nations, Austria-Hungary used during WW1 obsolete artillery weapons, but still performing well enough to help. Among these, the old bronze field guns of 8cm M75 and 9xm M75 went back into service with their old explosive (gunpowder) or shrapnell shells equipped with the fuzes that had been designed for them at the same period.

This is why it is not rare to find nowadays on the battlefields or in museums the old percussion fuzes Granaten Zünder G.Z. M75 (as well as the time fuzes M75/85c). These fuzes mechanism was particularily simple with a static percussion cap attached to the fuze top by a screw that could be accessed from the exterior, and a mobile graze pellet bearing the percussion pin. This mobile piece was kept out of range of the percussion cap by a cylindrical safety ring maintained in up position by a staple (stirrup spring). At the shot time this ring was pushed backwards and was kept attached to the mobile graze pellet under the action of the staple. This assembly was propulsed frontwards against the percussion cap at the arrival on the target. It seems no specific in-flight safety device (such as an intermediate weak spring between the pellet and the percussion cap) was integrated.

These fuzes were used with the shrapnel gunpowder shells of the :
  • 8 cm M1875 FK fieldguns
  • 8 cm M1895 (KasemattKanone), M1894 and M1898 (MinimalSchartenKanone) casemate guns
  • 8 cm M1894 fortress guns under cupola (PanzerKanone)
  • 8 cm M1894 fortress guns on shielded mounting (PanzerKanone)
  • 9 cm M1875 and M1875/96 FK fieldguns
  • 15 cm M1878 mortars


Percussion fuze G.Z. M75.
Percussion fuze G.Z. M75.
Percussion fuze G.Z. M75. Manufacturer's marking 'CP'
Percussion fuze G.Z. M75. Disassembled with, from the left to the right, the fuze head including the percussion cap, the head lower section, the retractable safety cylindrical ring, the graze pellet with the percussion pin, and the rear enveloppe.
Percussion fuze G.Z. M75. Assembled on an explosive shell ogive
Percussion fuze G.Z. M75. Manufacturer marking 'AZF'
Percussion fuze G.Z. M75. Wartime scheme



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Percussion fuze GZ M01
Percussion fuze G.Z. Muster 1901

The M75 percussion fuze was designed for the explosive shells of the 8cm and 9cm fieldguns; a specific 'M80' fuze was replacing it for the heavier calibers of 12cm, 15cm and 21cm. In 1901 a new percussion fuze Granaten Zünder G.Z. M01 was introduced, specially dedicated to the shells of the antique 12cm and 15cm guns M 1861 and 1861/95, used by the heavy artillery reserve units.

They were designed on the same inner mechanism basis than the M75 percussion fuzes.

This fuzes was used with the gunpowder explosive shells of the :
  • 12 cm guns M1861 and M1861/95
  • 15 cm M1861 and M1861/95 fortress guns
  • 15 cm M1878 mortars


Percussion fuze G.Z. M01.
Percussion fuze G.Z. M01.
Percussion fuze G.Z. M01.
Percussion fuze G.Z. M01. Rear view
Percussion fuze G.Z. M01. Wartime scheme



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Base percussion fuze ZV M09
Base percussion fuze ZündVorrichtung Z.V. Muster 1909

A unique kind of base percussion fuze was used with the high explosive shells of most of the heavy artillery weapons of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. This ZündVorrichtung Z.V. M09, entirely made with bronze and brass, was associated with a big detonator housed in a gaine in order to be able to trigger the detonation of the high explosive shells filled with 'Ekrasit'.

Most of the times the Z.V. M 09 was therefore inserted inside the gaine apparatus. For the shells of caliber 10 cm to 24 cm its base was visible on the shell rear face. When used with the famous 30.5 cm howitzers, it was hidden under a steel protection plate.

This fuze mechanism was composed with a static percussion pin traversing a cup shaped piece containing a safety spring, and a mobile graze pellet containing the percussion cap. Two steel spheres, maintained in position by a blocking ring, were insuring at rest a safety distance between the percussion pin and the percussion cap of the mobile graze pellet.

At the shot departure, the bocking ring was pushed back under the effcts of inertia and unmasked romms machined in the fuze inner wall in front of the steel balls. These latter, under the effect of the centrifugal force created by the shell spin, came into these lateral rooms. Then the safty spring was able to push the cup piece backwards maintaining from now on the graze pellet in low position. This way the fuze was armed but protected from unwanted in-flight triggering.

At the shell arrival on the target the graze pellet with the percussion cap was projected frontwards and easily compressed the safety spring. The starter was triggered by the percussion cap and the resulting flame was communicated through 3 holes to pyrotechnic chain détonator - detonator gaine - shell explosive charge - obus, sometimes including a small delay.

These fuzes were used with the high emplosive (Ekrasite) shells of the :
  • 10 cm M1899, M1908, M1910 and M1916 mountain howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899 and M1914 light field howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1905 M1906 fortress howitzers under cupola
  • 15 cm M1894, M1899, M1894/4, M1899/4 and M1914 heavy field howitzers
  • 24 cm M1898, M1898/07, M1895/010 and M1910/16 mortars
  • 30.5 cm mortars
Some of tehse fuzes are marked 'o/V' ('Ohne Verzögerung' - without delay), proving that the two versions with delay and without delay were existing.

Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09.
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09.
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. No markings on this one, that is therefore probably equipped with a delay
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. This one was torned by the explosion. See in the thread the room in wich can be seen one of the steel balls of the centrifugal safety system
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. Rear view with the 3 flame communicating holes.
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. Monnted inside a steel device containing the detonator gaine, itself inserted inside a bid adaptation ring. This latter diameter indicates a shell of 15 cm or more. Marking 'o/V' (without delay)
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. Side view of the gaine (that exploded) and the adaptation ring.
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. Wartime scheme. The fuze is inserted in the piece integrating the detonator gaine.
Base percussion fuze Z.V. M09. Functionning steps



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Time, or time and percussion fuzes


Fusée à temps M80 K
Fusée à temps Muster 1880 K

The techniques introduced in the old Austro-Hungarian time fuze M75/85c dedicated to the 8cm fieldguns were adopted almost identically in 1880 to build a fuze arming the shells of weapons of larger caliber.

The resulting Time fuze M1880 K was a device with a single fuzing disk (mobile), without percussion system. The disk was graduated from 0 to 19.5 'paces' (one 'pace being 0.758 m) with an fine graduation of 0.25 and engraved figures every unit.

Its time pellet (or 'concutor' was housed inside the hexagonal screwnut shaped head of the fuze. It was made of a a mobile graze pellet containing the percussion cap, facing a static percussion pin attached to a screw traversing the fuze base. A safety pin was locking at rest the mobile part of this system. The rear charge of the shrapnell shells that this fuze was equipping was ignited by the combustion of a gunpwder room located at the fuze base.

These fuzes were used with the schrapnell shells of the :
  • 12cm M1861 and M1861/95 guns
  • 15cm M1861 and M1861/95 guns of the mobile reserve of the heavy artillery
  • m15 cm M1878 mortars
A character 'K' was engraved on the fuze, but it was only indicating the composition of the gunpowder ('Kornpulver'), as opposed to the later time and percussion fuzes of the same nation, where the same 'K' was meaning the selection of a grape-shot behavior of the time system ('Kartätschrapnell').

Time fuze M80 K.
Time fuze M80 K. Zoom on the mobile disc graduated in red figures, ant the letter 'K'
Time fuze M80 K. Vew on the combustion fumes exhaust window
Time fuze M80 K. See, in the fuze hexagonal head that was housing the concussion system, the hole for the safety pin that was securizing it.
Time fuze M80 K. Rear view on the empty gunpowder room, and the head of the screw to which the concutor system percussion pin was attached.
Time fuze M80 K. Wartime scheme



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Time and percussion fuze DZ M93a
Time and percussion fuze for schrapnell shells D.Z. Muster 1893a

Two marks were separating the time fuze M80 from the time and percussion fuze M93a. A time fuze M85 probably derivating from the M80 fuze and dedicated to the converted M1875 8cm fieldguns, abd the very first Austro-Hungarian time and percussion fuze M91 destinated to the schrapnell shells of the 9cm M1875/96, M75/04 and M75/11 guns

The inheriting new model, the Time and percussion fuze M 93a was designed for the schrapnell shells of the weapons of caliber 12cm, 15cm and 18cm. It was a device including a time system made of two fuzing disks (the lower being mobile) allowing a longer combustion time, and a percussion system located in the threaded tail.

The time system concuting device was very similarto the one of the time fuze M80, still made of a mobile graze pellet bearing the percussion cap, locked at rest by a safety pin and located in the fuze hexagonal screwnut shaped head of the fuze. The percussion system was similarily composed of a static percussion pin and a mobile graze pellet containing the percussion cap, maintained in low position at rest by a staple (and perhaps a spring not represented on the schemes I have seen). Some sources also mention a safety pin for securizing the percussion system before use. The ignition of the shell rear charge was this time realized by a small tubular flame amplifier that was replacing the gunpowder room of the M80

The mobile disc graduations allowed the selection of 2 behaviors :
  • Time behavior with in-flight explosion - selected by one of the time ring scale graduations at a distance from 0 to 25 seconds with 0.25 subdivisions
  • Percussion behavior with explosion at the impact - selected by the 'A' ('Aufschlag') letter
All these fuzes models are named 'M93a', although it seems there has never been any 'M93', or 'M93b' versions...

The M93a time and percussion fuze was used with the schrapnell shells of the :
  • 12 cm M1880 heavy guns
  • 12 cm M1880 and M1896 fortress guns under casemate or turret
  • 15 cm M1894, M1899 and M1914 heavy field howitzers
  • 15 cm fortress howitzers under cupola
  • 15 cm M1880, M1898, M1895/7 and M1916 mortars
  • 15 cm M1878 mortars
  • 15 cm M1880 heavy guns
  • 18 cm M1880 heavy guns
Because of the limited maximum combustion time that was limiting the range (for instance less than 5000 m for the 15 cm howitzer), this fuze could see interestingly its flight time increased by the association with an additional time system having a constant combustion time. This 'Ergänzungszünder M93a' (for the guns), or Ergänzungszünder 'M93b' (for the howitzers) had the shape of a fuze, was initially made in aluminium then in brass, and was screwed on the top of the M93a fuze replacing its hexagonal screwnut shaped head housing the concutor system. It was including a conctutor system of the same type and a two static disks time system that was communicating with the empty housing of the M93a concutor system *.

Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a. See the small hole in the fuze head for the safety pin of the concutor.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a. Rear view with the flame amplifier tube that was communicating the flame to the rear charge of teh shell? The use of the two lateral holes is not appearing clearly on the period schemes, but were probably used with the percussion behavior.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a. Zoom on the mobile disk markings wuth graduations until 25, the 'A' letter for the percussion behavior, and the identification marking 'M93a' almost unreadable.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a disassembled.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a. Disassembled, see the two time rings with tracks.
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a. Wartime scheme
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. M93a. Wartime scheme showing the assembly with the additional time system 'Ergänzungszünder M93a' or 'M93b'



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Timea nd percussion fuze DZ M96, M96a and M96c
Time and percussion fuze D.Z. Muster 1896, 1896a and 1896c

In 1895 a new time and percussion fuze is introduced for the new 8cm M1894 fieldgun, graduated from 5 to 30 hundreds of meters and proposing a selectable percussion behavior (marking 'A') as well as a quick action at a very short range at 450 meters from the gun's muzzle (marking '45'). One year later, the version adapted for the 9 cm M 1875/96 guns is also adopted.

This 'Tima and percussion fuze D.Z. M96' had a profile identical to the one ofe the fuze M95, but was graduated from 6 to 48 hundreds of 'paces', that is 3638 m. The markings on the mobile disk were proposing 2 selectable behaviors (3 for the versions M96a and M96c):
  • Time behavior with in-flight explosion - selected by one of the time ring scale graduations at a distance from 6 to 48 hundreds of 'paces' (1 pace = 0.758 m) with 50 paces subdivisions
  • Percussion behavior with explosion at the impact - selected by the 'A' ('Aufschlag') letter
  • Cannister with explosion at the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'K' (Kartätschrapnell) letter, for the versions M96a and ML96c only.
These fuzes were used with the schrapnell shells of the :
  • 9 cm M1875, M1875/91 and M1875/96 fieldguns
  • 9 cm M1875, M1875/96, M1875/04 and M1875/11 fortress guns on casemate mounting


Time and percussion fuze M96a.
Time and percussion fuze. The marking 'K' for the cannister behavior, prenst only on the M96a and M96c is easily seen both on the mobile disk and the static disc
Time and percussion fuze. Zoom on the identification 'M96a' and the marking 'A' for the percussion behavior.
Time and percussion fuze. Two identical fuzes. The hole on the top of the head is only a consequence of the fuze having functionned, the wall thickness of the fuze body at that place being so weak that the concutor system has probably been ejected through it.
Time and percussion fuze. Rear view on the two fuzes. Both have lost the tubular tail communicating the flame to the shell rear charge.
Time and percussion fuze. Wartime scheme. It is strange this drawing does not show any 'K' marking although the represented fuze is a M96a.
Time and percussion fuze. Wartime scheme of tha M96, probably a prototype



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Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 and GDZ M99 for 7cm shell
Time and percussion fuze S.D.Z. Muster 99 for 7cm schrapnell shell
Time and percussion fuze G.D.Z. Muster 99 for 7cm high explosive shell

In 1899 a series of two fuzes appeared, of different size and shape but identically organized internally. The smaller of them was dedicated to the 7cm mountain guns and was proposed in two versions : the time and percussion SDZ M99 7cm for the schrapnell shells ('S.D.Z.' = 'SchrapnellDoppelZünder'), and the time and percussion GDZ M99 7cm for the high explosive shells ('G.D.Z.' = 'GranatenDoppelZünder'). In this latter case, the fuze was associated with a detonator gaine to allow it to detonate the high exploisive shell 'Ekrasite' load.

The markings on the mobile disk were proposing the different behaviors :
  • Time behavior with in-flight explosion - selected by one of the time ring scale graduations at a distance from 4 to 40.5 hundreds of meters with 50 meters subdivisions
  • Percussion behavior with explosion at the impact - selected by the 'A' ('Aufschlag') letter
  • Cannister with explosion at the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'K' (Kartätschrapnell) letter, for the version SDZ M99 only.
  • Cannister with delayed explosion at 200 m of the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'V' (Vortempierung) letter.
The SDZ M99 7cm were used with the schrapnell shells of the :
  • 7 cm M1899, M1908 and M1908/09 mountain guns
The GDZ M99 7cm were used with the high explosive ('Ekrasite') shells of the :
  • 7 cm M1899, M1908 and M1908/09 mountain guns


Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. The hole on the top of the head is only a consequence of the fuze having functionned, the wall thickness of the fuze body at that place being so weak that the concutor system has probably been ejected through it.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. The funnel shaped brass plate at the fuze base was in fact a part of the schrapnell shell equipped with the fuze.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. Zoom on the mobile disc markings : 'V' (200 m) than the flight distances starting at 4 hectomètres
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. Zoom on the mobile disc markings : end of the flight distances at 40.5, 'A' (percussion), 'K' (cannister) and the identification mark '7 cm M 99'.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. Manufacturer's mark 'CP' that appears on the fuze top as well.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. Zoom on the hole machined in the shell brass cup plate, that allowed the communication of the flamed directly to the shell load, probably in the case onf the percussion behavior.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm.
Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 7cm. Disassembled, see the two time rings.



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Time and percussion fuze SDZ M99, GDZ M99, M99a and M99b for 10cm shell
Time and percussion fuze for 10 cm schrapnell shell S.D.Z. Muster 99
Time and percussion fuze for 10 cm high explosive shell G.D.Z. Muster 99
Time and percussion fuze for 10 cm star shell Muster 99a and Muster 99b

As the 'time and percussion M99 for 7cm shells' was dedicated to the mountain guns of this caliber, a seconf family of the M99 fuze type was developped specifically for the 10cm howitzers : the time and percussion fuze SDZ M99 10cm for the schrapnell shells, the time and percussion fuze GDZ M99 10cm for the high explosive shells, and the time and percussion fuze M99a or M99b 10cm for the star shells.

The M99 fuzes, both for the 7 cm or the 10 cm shells, and throughout all their versions, were internally organized on the same principles introduced by the preceeding time and percussion fuzes and from now on classical : In the basic SDZ M99 fuze, a time system with two discs (the lower being mobile), a concuting system housed in the fuze head and secured at rest by a safety pin, and in the tail a percussion system secured at rest by a mobile safetyu cylindrical ring that was pushed back at the shot departure and a weak safetyu spring located between the static percussion pin and the mobile graze pellet bearing the percussion cap. A small detonator rod was attached to the fuze base.

The variant GDZ M99 was designed on the same basis, but was equipped with a big detonator gaine in order to be able to detonate the high explosive shells ('Ekrasite'), and the selactable 'K' (cannister behavior) was suppressed (no one wanted a high explosive shell to detonate at the muzzle outburst...). The variants M99a and M99b for star shells were following the same desing, without detonator gaine, with time graduations expressed in fractions of the total combustion lengthunités de durée de combustion, and the selectable 'K' (cannister) and 'V' (delayed explosion at 200 m from the muzzle) were both suppressed

The shape of these fuses was pretty aerodynamic and similar to the rotating discs type time and percussion fuzes of many other nations. I do not have any documentation on the thread sizes of these fuzes and shells.

The markings on the mobile disk were proposing the different behaviors :
  • Time behavior with in-flight explosion - selected by one of the time ring scale graduations at a distance from 4 to 56 hundreds of meters with 50 meters subdivisions. In the case of the M99a and M99b versions, the graduations were spreading from 0 to 25 with 1/4 subdivisions, that is a total of 100 graduations representing each 1/100th of the total length of the time fuzing composition track.
  • Percussion behavior with explosion at the impact - selected by the 'A' ('Aufschlag') letter
  • Cannister with explosion at the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'K' (Kartätschrapnell) letter, for the version 'SDZ M99' for schrapnell shells only.
  • Cannister with delayed explosion at 200 m of the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'V' (Vortempierung) letter, only for the version 'SDZ M99' for schrapnell shells and the version 'GDZ M99' for high explosive shells .
The SDZ M99 10cm fuzes were used with the schrapnell shells of the :
  • 10 cm M1899 and M1914 field howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1908, M1910 and M1916 mountain howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1905, M1906 and M1909 fortress howitzers under cupola
The SDZ M99 10cm fuzes were used with the high explosive shells ('Ekrasite') of the :
  • 10 cm M1899 and M1914 field howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1908, M1910 and M1916 mountain howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1905, M1906 and M1909 fortress howitzers under cupola
The M99a were used with the star shells of the :
  • 15 cm M1894, M1899, M1899/04, M1899/04 and M1915 heavy field howitzers
  • 15 cm M1894 and M1899 fortress howitzers under cupola
  • 15 cm M1880, M1898, M1898/07 and 1916 mortars
  • 15 cm M1880 fortress mortars under cupola or on sledge mounting
  • 21 cm M1880 coastal defense mortars
  • 21 cm M1916 mortars
  • 24 cm M1880, M1898, M1898/07, M1895/10 and M1910/15 mortars
The M99b were used with the star shells of the :
  • 10 cm M1899 and M1914 field howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1908, M1910 and M1916 mountain howitzers
  • 10 cm M1899, M1905, M1906 and M1909 fortress howitzers under cupola


Time and percussion fuze M99.
Time and percussion fuze M99. This fuze drawings I have do nnot explain the role of the small hole at the top of the fuze
Time and percussion fuze M99. SDZ version with a 'K' marking in addition to the 'A' and 'V' ones
Time and percussion fuze M99.
Time and percussion fuze M99. Zoom on the hole machined in the shell brass cup plate, that allowed the communication of the flamed directly to the shell load, probably in the case onf the percussion behavior.
Time and percussion fuze M99. In this piece the shell brass plate is not attached : see the room of the percussion system.
Time and percussion fuze M99. Disassembled and showing the two time discs tracks.
Time and percussion fuze M99. Zoom on the manufacturing markings '44 IV 14'
Time and percussion fuze M99. Wartime scheme of a SDZ version (presence of all the 'A', 'K' and 'V' markings)
Time and percussion fuze M99a. Wartime scheme of a M99a version for star shells (the markings 'K' and 'V' are missing)



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Time and percussion fuze SDZ M05 and GDZ M05
Time and percussion fuze for schrapnell shell S.D.Z. Muster 05
Time and percussion fuze for high explosive shell G.D.Z. Muster 05

In 1905 Austrai-Hungary adopts the 8 cm M1905 FK fieldgun that finally allows the Empire to enter the 'club' of the nations possessing a modern quick fire field gun, although noticeabily less performant than the contemporary French 75mm Mle 1897 or the German 7.7cm FK96 n/A.

At this occasion a new time and percussion fuze is designed, destinated to the shells of this new weapon. The Time and percussion fuze SDZ M05, dedicated to the shrapnell shells, was very likely a simple adaptation of the time and percussion fuze M99 to the 8 cm shells, with the same internal organization and some rare novelties and a little extension of the range (6100 m) .

For tyhe use with the high explosive shells ('Ekrasite'), a variant GDZ M05 was used with the same characteristics but without the 'K' functionality (bcannister), and with an added dtonator gaine fixed at the base.

The markings of the mobile disc were proposing the different behaviors :
  • Time behavior with in-flight explosion - selected by one of the time ring scale graduations at a distance from 4 to 61 hundreds of meters with 50 meters subdivisions.
  • Percussion behavior with explosion at the impact - selected by the 'A' ('Aufschlag') letter
  • Cannister with explosion at the gun's muzzle exit (5 to 10m) - selected by the 'K' (Kartätschrapnell) letter, for the version 'SDZ M05' for schrapnell shells only.
  • Cannister with delayed explosion at 200 m of the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'V' (Vortempierung) letter,
The M05 fuzes were used with the schrapnell (SDZ M05 fuze) and high explosive (GDZ M05 fuze) shells of the :
  • 8 cm M1905 and M1905/08 fieldguns
  • 8 cm M1905 and M1905/08 fortress guns


Time and percussion fuze M05.
Time and percussion fuze M05. Top view
Time and percussion fuze M05. Zoom on the start of the disc markings with 'V' for the delayed cannister explosion
Time and percussion fuze M05. Rear view on the fuze base with the schrapnell shell brass cup plate still attached
Time and percussion fuze M05. Zoom on the hole machined in the shell brass cup plate, that allowed the communication of the flamed directly to the shell load, probably in the case onf the percussion behavior.
Time and percussion fuze M05. Zoom on the end of the disk markings with last graduation (61), the marking 'K' (Cannister) and the identification mark 'M05'. This fuze is obviously a SDZ type
Time and percussion fuze M05.Wartime scheme



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Time and percussion SDZ M08 and GDZ M08
Time and percussion fuze for schrapnell shell S.D.Z. Muster 08
Time and percussion fuze for high explosive shell G.D.Z. Muster 08B
Time and percussion fuze Muster 08B

The time and percussion fuze M08 appeared in 1908, while Austro-Hungaria had quite improved its 8 cm M05 FK fieldgun in a modified version M05/08 better adapted to the mountain war and allowing a graeter elevation angle.

This fuze was an evolution of the preceeding M05 one. The first series were graduated from 5 to 61 hundreds of meters just as the M05, then later an increase of the combustion time allowed to make the range longer, and the graduations then were changed into 5 to 73 hundreds of meters.

The profile of these fuzes was quite particuliar, with a machined groove all arounf the head, in which the joles for the concutor system safety pin were drilled. Finally, 4 pairs of studs were added on the rotating disc in order to allow to adjust manually the position of the graduated disc on the desired marking, although it was still possible as well to use a setting key.

The SDZ M08 fuze was dedicated to the schrapnell shells. For the high explosive shells ('Ekrasite'), a variant GDZ M08 was used with the same characteristics, but without the 'K' (cannister) functionnality.

The markings of the mobile disc were proposing the different behaviors :
  • Time behavior with in-flight explosion - selected by one of the time ring scale graduations at a distance from 6 to 61 hundreds of meters (later from 6 to 73 hundreds of meters) with 50 meters subdivisions.
  • Percussion behavior with explosion at the impact - selected by the 'A' ('Aufschlag') letter
  • Cannister with explosion at the gun's muzzle exit (5 to 10m) - selected by the 'K' (Kartätschrapnell) letter, for the version 'SDZ M08' for schrapnell shells only.
  • Cannister with delayed explosion at 200 m of the gun's muzzle exit - selected by the 'V' (Vortempierung) letter,
The M08 fuzes were used with the schrapnell shells (fuze SDZ M08) and high explosive shells (fuze GDZ M08) of the :
  • 8 cm M1905 and M1905/08 fieldguns
  • 8 cm M1905 and M1905/08 fortress guns
During the war an alternative version was made with a steel body and without the machined groove in the head. but the two discs (static and mobile) remained in brass.

Finally, a last variant named time and percussion fuze M08B is known, also introduced during the war. This simple letter does not translate well the fact this was a really different device. Made in a white metal alloy (but for the two discs that were still in bronze) but covered with a layer of protective yellow vernish looking like brass, its shape and characteristics were quite different. The lower disc, used for the 8cm gun using the small propulsive charge, was graduated from 6 to 56 hundreds of meters. The upper disc, used for the 8cm gun using the large propulsive charge, was graduated from 40 to 63 hundreds of meters and was marked 'Zusatzladung' (additionnal charge).

Time and percussion fize M08.
Time and percussion fize M08. The two pieces presented on this picture slightly differ by the color of their bronze material, but also by their graduated scale : from 6 to 71 with narrower space between graduations for the left side item, and from 6 to 73 for the right side item
Time and percussion fize M08. The concutor system of one of the fuzes was ejected through the top of the fuze head when the shell exploded, while on the other item it just stamped it a little.
Time and percussion fize M08.
Time and percussion fize M08. Top view with the room for the concutor system that hes been ejected.
Time and percussion fize M08. Zoom on the beginning of the markings of the mobile disc : letters 'K' and 'V', more logically located side to side and located close to the start of the graduated scale ('6').
Time and percussion fize M08. Zoom on the end of the markings of the mobile disc : graduations ('73'), the letter 'A' and the identificationk mark 'M08'
Time and percussion fize M08. Rear view
Time and percussion fize M08. Manufacturing markings '5 - E - 14'
Time and percussion fize M08. Wartime scheme with, from left to right, a classical M08 fuze with graduations up to 73, a M08 version in steel, and a early M08 fuze with graduations up to 61.



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